4:21 PM 11/8/2017 – British aid minister Patel resigns in new test for PM May

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British aid minister Patel resigns in new test for PM May
Today’s Headlines and Commentary
Solving the Mystery of the Maltese Professor
The Trump Campaigns Spy-Ties to Moscow Have Been Exposed
Syrian army, allies, take last IS stronghold in Syria: commander
Syrian army, allies, take last IS stronghold in Syria: commander – Reuters
Syria civil war: Last major IS town Albu Kamal ‘captured’
Deutsche Welle: El Chapo to receive psych evaluation while awaiting trial
Puerto Rico reports increase in overall deaths after storm
Twitter, Snapchat Tweak Products to Lure More Users
Facing Russian threat, NATO boosts operations for the first time since the Cold War
The Trump Campaigns Spy-Ties to Moscow Have Been Exposed
Solving the Mystery of the Maltese Professor
The Real Reason America’s Super Battleships Will Never Make A Comeback: No ‘Bullets’
Today’s Headlines and Commentary
After his overseas trip, there may be nothing left for Donald Trump to come back to
Carter Page confesses, confirms key claim in Trump-Russia dossier
Michael Flynn is facing kidnapping charges, and Paul Manafort is facing murder charges
What if this is just an act and Carter Page is fooling us all?
Donald Trumps secret CIA plot to sabotage the Trump-Russia probe has been exposed, and its laughably inept
Donald Trump and Mike Pence just got their asses handed to them
“*Insider: Trump-Russia arrests have Jared Kushner panicking, and Ivanka Trumps life is in ruins
Robert Muellers ouster of Donald Trump just got twice as easy
Twenty-two new criminal charges emerge against seven new defendants in Donald Trumps Russia scandal
Russia investigators probe 2016 GOP platform fight – Politico

 

Saved Stories – None
British aid minister Patel resigns in new test for PM May

LONDON (Reuters) – British aid minister Priti Patel was forced from office on Wednesday over undisclosed meetings with Israeli officials after Prime Minister Theresa May sought to reassert her diminished authority as she negotiates Brexit.

Today’s Headlines and Commentary

mikenova shared this story from Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices.

In a speech to South Korean lawmakers, President Donald Trump warned North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un not to underestimate the United States, the Wall Street Journal reported. In a portion of the address directed at Kim, Trump called for Pyongyang to end its nuclear and ballistic missile programs. Heavy fog forced Trump to cancel a surprise visit to the demilitarized zone separating North and South Korea, the New York Times reported.

Trump then headed to China, arriving on Wednesday. He plans to ask Chinese President Xi Jinping to increase economic pressure on Pyongyang, according to the Times. Xi opened Trumps visit by offering a series of business deals and a private tour of the Forbidden City, but Trump and Xi may struggle to find common ground on both trade and measures against North Korea, the Journal reported.

The Senate banking committee approved a bill that would impose harsh new sanctions on Chinese financial institutions assisting North Korea, Foreign Policy reported. The bipartisan legislation targets companies that help North Korea evade sanctions. Sen. Chris Van Hollen said it would put some real teeth in sanctions.

The European Unions foreign policy chief received assurances from U.S. lawmakers that they plan to comply with the Iran nuclear deal, Reuters reported. Federica Mogherini said congressional officials told her their intention is to keep the U.S. in the agreement.

Russia criticized a U.N. report that labeled the Syrian government as responsible for the April chemical weapons attack in Khan Sheikhoun, the Times reported. Russias representative to the Security Council faulted U.N. investigators for not visiting the site of the attack. The U.S. and the United Kingdom supported the reports findings. Russia and the U.S. have circulated conflicting resolutions to extend the investigators mandate.

Spains constitutional court officially struck down Catalonias declaration of independence, according toReuters. The move formally ended the autonomous regions bid for separation from Spain.

Saudi Arabia expanded its crackdown on political corruption, targeting up to $800 billion of assets belonging to dozens of princes and businessmen, the Journal reported. The anti-corruption push has frozen the accounts of political opponents of the crown prince. Their seized assets may bring in billions to the Saudi government. Separately, Saudi airstrikes killed dozens of civilians in northern Yemen, including women and children, Al Jazeera reported. The strikes targeted Houthi rebel group villages.

Lebanons prime minister remained in Saudi Arabia, prolonging a political crisis in Beirut, the Journal reported. Saadi Hariri said he resigned his post on Sunday in Riyadh, but Lebanons president said he would not accept the resignation until Hariri returns freely to Beirut. Hariri visited the United Arab Emirates on Tuesday but then returned to Saudi Arabia. The leader of Hezbollah, one of Hariris political opponents, said he believed Saudi Arabia was holding Hariri against his will.

The Philippines halted construction on a small island in the South China Sea to avoid angering China,the Times reported. President Rodrigo Duterte ordered military construction on a sandbar in the Spratly Islands to cease after Chinese officials put pressure on the Philippines to stop its building efforts.

Mike Pompeo, the CIA director, met with a former intelligence official who advocates the unsupported idea that Russian intelligence services did not hack the Democratic National Convention (DNC), the Intercept reported. Pompeo met with William Binney, a former NSA official turned critic, to discuss Binneys paper arguing that a DNC insider committed the hack, not Russian spies. According to Binney, Pompeo told him Trump urged Pompeo to take the meeting.

Politicos Cory Bennett wrote about one international accord the Trump administration is keeping: the U.S.-China cyber espionage agreement.

The Times Paul Mozer detailed how China uses Facebook to spread propaganda abroad.

Politicos Josh Gerstein covered the released audio of George Papadopoulos July arraignment.

 

ICYMI: Yesterday on Lawfare

Paul Rosenzweig flagged the American Bar Associations newly released cybersecurity handbook for lawyers.

J. Dana Stuster updated the Middle East Ticker, covering the power play in Saudi Arabia and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salmans aggressive foreign policy moves.

Mieke Eoyang, Ben Freeman, Adam Twardowski and Benjamin Wittes analyzed survey data on public confidence in the president and the military on specific national security issues.

Sarah Grant summarized military commissions hearings from last Thursday and Friday, covering the habeas petition for Brig. Gen. John Baker.

Tamara Cofman Wittes and Brian Reeves analyzed policy options for reconstructing the newly captured city of Raqqa.

Robert Chesney and Steve Vladeck shared the National Security Law Podcast, covering developments in the Mueller investigation, military commissions news, and the hybrid model of detainee interrogation and prosecution.

Vanessa Sauter posted the Lawfare Podcast, featuring a discussion between Benjamin Wittes and Susan Landau on her new book Listening In.

 

Email the Roundup Team noteworthy law and security-related articles to include, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook for additional commentary on these issues. Sign up to receive Lawfare in your inbox. Visit ourEvents Calendar to learn about upcoming national security events, and check out relevant job openings on ourJob Board.

Solving the Mystery of the Maltese Professor

mikenova shared this story from The XX Committee.

This week began with the bombshell legal news that Special Counsel Robert Mueller brought charges against members of Team Trump relating to their illicit ties to Moscow. As I explained, this fundamentally changes the game in our nations capital, and the White House is struggling to cope with this new environment, which finds the president on the defensive, awaiting further indictments of his associates.

No aspect of this weeks news is more mysterious than the saga of the Professorin reality, Joseph Mifsud, a Maltese nationalwho served as the hush-hush go-between for the Trump campaign and the Kremlin in the spring of 2016. Notably, he acted as Moscows cut-out for contacts with George Papadopoulos, a foreign policy advisor hired by the Trump campaign in the late winter of 2016.

Mifsuds role is crystal-clear to anyone versed in Russian espionage tradecraft, what the Kremlin calls konspiratsiya (yes, conspiracy). He is a secret operative of Russias Foreign Intelligence Service, the SVR, as I elaborated:

Papadopoulos met the Professor in Italy in mid-March 2016, then again in London later that month; on the latter occasion the Professor brought along a Russian female, allegedly Putins niece, to help facilitate the engagement. Papadopoulos emailed the campaign about the success of this meeting, which responded enthusiastically about what had transpired and on March 31, he participated in a national security meeting in Washington that included campaign principals, with Trump himself present.

But Misfuds role soon moved into even darker territory:

Read the rest at The Observer …

Filed under: CounterintelligenceEspionageUSG

The Trump Campaigns Spy-Ties to Moscow Have Been Exposed

mikenova shared this story from The XX Committee.

Yesterday was filled with legal bombshells for President Donald Trump. As expected, after months of investigation into the White Houses ties to Moscow, Special Counsel Robert Muellers team announced three arrests and indictments. Together, these cases have fundamentally shifted the game in our nations capitalvery much to the presidents detriment.

The arrest of Paul Manafort, Trumps campaign manager in the summer of 2016 who secured him the Republican Partys nomination, was expected by many. For months, rumors had swirled around Manafort, given his longstanding and unsavory ties to Russian and Ukrainian oligarchs, compounded by his barely concealed links to Kremlin intelligence, as I reported three months before the November 2016 election.

Manafort has surrendered to the FBI and faces a dozen federal charges relating to financial crimes including money laundering, failing to register as a foreign agent, plus neglecting to report foreign cash to the IRS. These charges are serious and will be difficult for Manafort to beat, leading to speculation that what Mueller really wants is Manaforts cooperation against Team Trumpwhich may be the 68-year-olds only alternative to dying in prison.

Rick Gates, a Manafort protégé and 2016 Trump campaign associate, has also surrendered to the Feds and is facing a raft of charges relating to money laundering. Gates also played a key role in President Trumps inauguration and pushed the White Houses agenda as a lobbyist until April of this year, when questions about Gates ties to the Kremlin made his position untenable.

On cue, the White House protested that they barely know Manafort and Gatesa transparent falsehoodwhile stating that their alleged crimes have nothing directly to do with the president. The latter may be technically true, but difficult questions lurk regarding why Donald Trump wanted someone as unsavory and Moscow-connected as Paul Manafort to head his campaign, particularly since the longtime swamp denizen Manaforts links to Eastern oligarchs were an open secret in Washington.

Read the rest at The Observer …

Filed under: CounterintelligenceEspionageUSG

Syrian army, allies, take last IS stronghold in Syria: commander

BEIRUT (Reuters) – Syria’s army and its allies, led in the battle by Lebanon’s Hezbollah, have captured the last major Islamic State-held town in Syria, a commander in the military alliance supporting Syrian President Bashar al-Assad said on Wednesday.

Syrian army, allies, take last IS stronghold in Syria: commander – Reuters


Reuters
Syrian army, allies, take last IS stronghold in Syria: commander
Reuters
BEIRUT (Reuters) – Syria’s army and its allies, led in the battle by Lebanon’s Hezbollah, have captured the last major Islamic State-held town in Syria, a commander in the military alliance supporting Syrian President Bashar al-Assad said on Wednesday. 
Scrambling to Track Islamic State Terrorists, Coalition Turns to BiometricsVoice of America
Syria civil war: Last major IS town Albu Kamal ‘captured’BBC News
Syrian Troops Encircle Last Islamic State-Held Town
 
Syrian troops encircle last Islamic State-held townABC News
Last Islamic State Town in Syria Falls to Army: Commander
 U.S. News & World Report
 
Syrian army and allies ‘take last major Islamic State stronghold in Syria leaving terror group close to total collapse’Telegraph.co.uk
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Christian PostDaily Mail XinhuaRT
all 60 Reuters UK
all 55
 
news articles »
Syria civil war: Last major IS town Albu Kamal ‘captured’

Iraqi forces take part in a Syrian army operation on the border, government sources say.
Deutsche Welle: El Chapo to receive psych evaluation while awaiting trial

A US judge has authorized a psychological examination for Joaquin Guzman. Lawyers say El Chapo’s mental state is deteriorating in the New York jail where he awaits trial on charges of trafficking from Mexico to the US.

 Deutsche Welle

Puerto Rico reports increase in overall deaths after storm

The pace of deaths quickened on Puerto Rico immediately after Hurricane Maria well beyond the numbers officially attributed to the storm.
Twitter, Snapchat Tweak Products to Lure More Users

Struggling social media platforms Twitter and Snapchat are taking on new looks as the services seek wider audiences in the shadow of Facebook. Twitter is rolling out a 280-character limit for nearly all its users, abandoning its iconic 140-character limit for tweets. And Snapchat, long popular with young people, will undergo a revamp in hopes of becoming easier to use for everyone else. Both services announced the moves Tuesday as they look for ways to expand beyond their passionate…

Facing Russian threat, NATO boosts operations for the first time since the Cold War

Plans for new bases would defend against Russian subs and speed troops across Europe during war.

The Trump Campaigns Spy-Ties to Moscow Have Been Exposed

Yesterday was filled with legal bombshells for President Donald Trump. As expected, after months of investigation into the White Houses ties to Moscow, Special Counsel Robert Muellers team announced three arrests and indictments. Together, these cases have fundamentally shifted the game in our nations capitalvery much to the presidents detriment.

The arrest of Paul Manafort, Trumps campaign manager in the summer of 2016 who secured him the Republican Partys nomination, was expected by many. For months, rumors had swirled around Manafort, given his longstanding and unsavory ties to Russian and Ukrainian oligarchs, compounded by his barely concealed links to Kremlin intelligence, as I reported three months before the November 2016 election.

Manafort has surrendered to the FBI and faces a dozen federal charges relating to financial crimes including money laundering, failing to register as a foreign agent, plus neglecting to report foreign cash to the IRS. These charges are serious and will be difficult for Manafort to beat, leading to speculation that what Mueller really wants is Manaforts cooperation against Team Trumpwhich may be the 68-year-olds only alternative to dying in prison.

Rick Gates, a Manafort protégé and 2016 Trump campaign associate, has also surrendered to the Feds and is facing a raft of charges relating to money laundering. Gates also played a key role in President Trumps inauguration and pushed the White Houses agenda as a lobbyist until April of this year, when questions about Gates ties to the Kremlin made his position untenable.

On cue, the White House protested that they barely know Manafort and Gatesa transparent falsehoodwhile stating that their alleged crimes have nothing directly to do with the president. The latter may be technically true, but difficult questions lurk regarding why Donald Trump wanted someone as unsavory and Moscow-connected as Paul Manafort to head his campaign, particularly since the longtime swamp denizen Manaforts links to Eastern oligarchs were an open secret in Washington.

Read the rest at The Observer …

Filed under: CounterintelligenceEspionageUSG

Solving the Mystery of the Maltese Professor

This week began with the bombshell legal news that Special Counsel Robert Mueller brought charges against members of Team Trump relating to their illicit ties to Moscow. As I explained, this fundamentally changes the game in our nations capital, and the White House is struggling to cope with this new environment, which finds the president on the defensive, awaiting further indictments of his associates.

No aspect of this weeks news is more mysterious than the saga of the Professorin reality, Joseph Mifsud, a Maltese nationalwho served as the hush-hush go-between for the Trump campaign and the Kremlin in the spring of 2016. Notably, he acted as Moscows cut-out for contacts with George Papadopoulos, a foreign policy advisor hired by the Trump campaign in the late winter of 2016.

Mifsuds role is crystal-clear to anyone versed in Russian espionage tradecraft, what the Kremlin calls konspiratsiya (yes, conspiracy). He is a secret operative of Russias Foreign Intelligence Service, the SVR, as I elaborated:

Papadopoulos met the Professor in Italy in mid-March 2016, then again in London later that month; on the latter occasion the Professor brought along a Russian female, allegedly Putins niece, to help facilitate the engagement. Papadopoulos emailed the campaign about the success of this meeting, which responded enthusiastically about what had transpired and on March 31, he participated in a national security meeting in Washington that included campaign principals, with Trump himself present.

But Misfuds role soon moved into even darker territory:

Read the rest at The Observer …

Filed under: CounterintelligenceEspionageUSG

The Real Reason America’s Super Battleships Will Never Make A Comeback: No ‘Bullets’

James Holmes

Security,

And other very obvious reasons.

Nor, evidently, is there any safe ammunition for battleship big guns to fire. We used 1950s-vintage 16-inch rounds and powder during the 1980s and 1990s. Any such rounds still in existence are now over sixty years old, while the U.S. Navy is apparently looking to demilitarize and dispose of them. Gearing up to produce barrels and ammunition in small batches would represent a nonstarter for defense firms. The navy recently canceled the destroyer USS Zumwalts advanced gun rounds because costs spiraled above $800,000 apiece. That was a function of ordering few munitions for what is just a three-ship class. Ammunition was simply unaffordable. Modernized Iowas would find themselves in the same predicament, if not more so.

Theres a mystique to battleships. Whenever inside-the-Beltway dwellers debate how to bulk up the U.S. Navy fleet, odds are sentimentalists will clamor to return the Iowa-class dreadnoughts to service. Nor is the idea of bringing back grizzled World War II veterans as zany as it sounds. We arent talking equipping the 1914-vintage USS Texas with superweapons to blast the Soviet Navy, or resurrecting the sunken Imperial Japanese Navy superbattleship Yamato for duty in outer space, or keeping USS Missouri battleworthy in case aliens menace the Hawaiian Islands. Such proposals are not mere whimsy.

Built to duel Japan in World War II, in fact, battleships were recommissioned for the Korean War, the Vietnam War, and the Cold War. The last returned to action in 1988. The Iowa class sat in mothballs for about three decades after Korea (except for USS New Jersey, which returned to duty briefly during the Vietnam War). Thats about how long the battlewagons have been in retirement since the Cold War. History thus seems to indicate they could stage yet another comeback. At this remove from their past lives, though, its doubtful in the extreme that the operational return on investment would repay the cost, effort, and human capital necessary to bring them back to life.

Read full article

Today’s Headlines and Commentary

In a speech to South Korean lawmakers, President Donald Trump warned North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un not to underestimate the United States, the Wall Street Journal reported. In a portion of the address directed at Kim, Trump called for Pyongyang to end its nuclear and ballistic missile programs. Heavy fog forced Trump to cancel a surprise visit to the demilitarized zone separating North and South Korea, the New York Times reported.

Trump then headed to China, arriving on Wednesday. He plans to ask Chinese President Xi Jinping to increase economic pressure on Pyongyang, according to the Times. Xi opened Trumps visit by offering a series of business deals and a private tour of the Forbidden City, but Trump and Xi may struggle to find common ground on both trade and measures against North Korea, the Journal reported.

The Senate banking committee approved a bill that would impose harsh new sanctions on Chinese financial institutions assisting North Korea, Foreign Policy reported. The bipartisan legislation targets companies that help North Korea evade sanctions. Sen. Chris Van Hollen said it would put some real teeth in sanctions.

The European Unions foreign policy chief received assurances from U.S. lawmakers that they plan to comply with the Iran nuclear deal, Reuters reported. Federica Mogherini said congressional officials told her their intention is to keep the U.S. in the agreement.

Russia criticized a U.N. report that labeled the Syrian government as responsible for the April chemical weapons attack in Khan Sheikhoun, the Times reported. Russias representative to the Security Council faulted U.N. investigators for not visiting the site of the attack. The U.S. and the United Kingdom supported the reports findings. Russia and the U.S. have circulated conflicting resolutions to extend the investigators mandate.

Spains constitutional court officially struck down Catalonias declaration of independence, according toReuters. The move formally ended the autonomous regions bid for separation from Spain.

Saudi Arabia expanded its crackdown on political corruption, targeting up to $800 billion of assets belonging to dozens of princes and businessmen, the Journal reported. The anti-corruption push has frozen the accounts of political opponents of the crown prince. Their seized assets may bring in billions to the Saudi government. Separately, Saudi airstrikes killed dozens of civilians in northern Yemen, including women and children, Al Jazeera reported. The strikes targeted Houthi rebel group villages.

Lebanons prime minister remained in Saudi Arabia, prolonging a political crisis in Beirut, the Journal reported. Saadi Hariri said he resigned his post on Sunday in Riyadh, but Lebanons president said he would not accept the resignation until Hariri returns freely to Beirut. Hariri visited the United Arab Emirates on Tuesday but then returned to Saudi Arabia. The leader of Hezbollah, one of Hariris political opponents, said he believed Saudi Arabia was holding Hariri against his will.

The Philippines halted construction on a small island in the South China Sea to avoid angering China,the Times reported. President Rodrigo Duterte ordered military construction on a sandbar in the Spratly Islands to cease after Chinese officials put pressure on the Philippines to stop its building efforts.

Mike Pompeo, the CIA director, met with a former intelligence official who advocates the unsupported idea that Russian intelligence services did not hack the Democratic National Convention (DNC), the Intercept reported. Pompeo met with William Binney, a former NSA official turned critic, to discuss Binneys paper arguing that a DNC insider committed the hack, not Russian spies. According to Binney, Pompeo told him Trump urged Pompeo to take the meeting.

Politicos Cory Bennett wrote about one international accord the Trump administration is keeping: the U.S.-China cyber espionage agreement.

The Times Paul Mozer detailed how China uses Facebook to spread propaganda abroad.

Politicos Josh Gerstein covered the released audio of George Papadopoulos July arraignment.

 

ICYMI: Yesterday on Lawfare

Paul Rosenzweig flagged the American Bar Associations newly released cybersecurity handbook for lawyers.

J. Dana Stuster updated the Middle East Ticker, covering the power play in Saudi Arabia and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salmans aggressive foreign policy moves.

Mieke Eoyang, Ben Freeman, Adam Twardowski and Benjamin Wittes analyzed survey data on public confidence in the president and the military on specific national security issues.

Sarah Grant summarized military commissions hearings from last Thursday and Friday, covering the habeas petition for Brig. Gen. John Baker.

Tamara Cofman Wittes and Brian Reeves analyzed policy options for reconstructing the newly captured city of Raqqa.

Robert Chesney and Steve Vladeck shared the National Security Law Podcast, covering developments in the Mueller investigation, military commissions news, and the hybrid model of detainee interrogation and prosecution.

Vanessa Sauter posted the Lawfare Podcast, featuring a discussion between Benjamin Wittes and Susan Landau on her new book Listening In.

 

Email the Roundup Team noteworthy law and security-related articles to include, and follow us on Twitter and Facebook for additional commentary on these issues. Sign up to receive Lawfare in your inbox. Visit ourEvents Calendar to learn about upcoming national security events, and check out relevant job openings on ourJob Board.

After his overseas trip, there may be nothing left for Donald Trump to come back to

After his overseas trip, there may be nothing left for Donald Trump to come back to

After his overseas trip, there may be nothing left for Donald Trump to come back to

Donald Trump’s world is crumbling by the day and he’s marooned overseas

Carter Page confesses, confirms key claim in Trump-Russia dossier

Carter Page confesses, confirms key claim in Trump-Russia dossier

Carter Page confesses, confirms key claim in Trump-Russia dossier

If you’ve been waiting for the Rosneft deal to finally come into play in Trump-Russia, here it is

Michael Flynn is facing kidnapping charges, and Paul Manafort is facing murder charges

Michael Flynn is facing kidnapping charges, and Paul Manafort is facing murder charges

Michael Flynn is facing kidnapping charges, and Paul Manafort is facing murder charges

Donald Trump’s Russia scandal has found a whole new way to get ugly

What if this is just an act and Carter Page is fooling us all?

What if this is just an act and Carter Page is fooling us all?

What if this is just an act and Carter Page is fooling us all?

What if there’s more to this “idiot” Carter Page than we think?

Donald Trumps secret CIA plot to sabotage the Trump-Russia probe has been exposed, and its laughably inept

Donald Trumps secret CIA plot to sabotage the Trump-Russia probe has been exposed, and its laughably inept

Donald Trumps secret CIA plot to sabotage the Trump-Russia probe has been exposed, and its laughably inept

If this is all Donald Trump has left up his sleeve, it’s all over for him

Donald Trump and Mike Pence just got their asses handed to them

Donald Trump and Mike Pence just got their asses handed to them

Donald Trump and Mike Pence just got their asses handed to them

Donald Trump and Mike Pence are both screwed

“*Insider: Trump-Russia arrests have Jared Kushner panicking, and Ivanka Trumps life is in ruins

“*Insider: Trump-Russia arrests have Jared Kushner panicking, and Ivanka Trumps life is in ruins

Insider: Trump-Russia arrests have Jared Kushner panicking, and Ivanka Trumps life is in ruins

This is even uglier for Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump than we imagined

Robert Muellers ouster of Donald Trump just got twice as easy

Robert Muellers ouster of Donald Trump just got twice as easy

Robert Muellers ouster of Donald Trump just got twice as easy

Robert Mueller just scored big without lifting a finger

Twenty-two new criminal charges emerge against seven new defendants in Donald Trumps Russia scandal

Twenty-two new criminal charges emerge against seven new defendants in Donald Trumps Russia scandal

Twenty-two new criminal charges emerge against seven new defendants in Donald Trumps Russia scandal

Robert Mueller is moving ahead at light speed

Russia investigators probe 2016 GOP platform fight – Politico


Politico
Russia investigators probe 2016 GOP platform fight
Politico
Now that year-old debate is getting fresh scrutiny from the ongoing investigations into how Moscow meddled in the 2016 election and whether any Trump aides were involved, including then-convention manager Paul Manafort. The president has repeatedly …

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